The State of Economic Equity

The State of Economic Equity describes the nation’s current economic outlook using an equity lens. The Institute for Economic Equity produces this work to examine challenges and outcomes for vulnerableVulnerable groups are those that have economic outcomes below the overall average or their peers. For example, single mothers face structural barriers that restrict their employment. Black or Hispanic/Latino families and less-educated families have lower levels of wealth than their peers. Fewer resources, labor market challenges and greater sensitivity to macroeconomic conditions make it more difficult for these groups to be economically resilient and upwardly mobile. groups and communities. We explore major economic trends that are expected to impact families over the near term and discuss ways to bolster economic resiliency. Our hope is that individuals, leaders and organizations can access this information and data to help their communities thrive.

Learn how the broader economy could benefit from equitable purchasing power.

2023 State of Economic Equity

The 2023 series:

  • focuses on new and continuing economic pressures, including inflation and weaker labor market outcomes for vulnerable groups
  • proposes four cases for pursuing economic equity and takes a deeper look at wealth equity and how it could support U.S. economic growth
  • examines the role community organizations play in fostering economic security

2022 State of Economic Equity

The 2022 series focused on the continued recovery from COVID-19-related economic pressures, especially for low- and moderate-income communities. Specifically, it outlined how child care and housing affordability were key to an equitable recovery. It also discussed household debt and the critical transition period for families as relief policies were scheduled to end. Finally, it proposed five ideas that could help families become more resilient among growing wealth inequality.


Note

  1. Vulnerable groups are those that have economic outcomes below the overall average or their peers. For example, single mothers face structural barriers that restrict their employment. Black or Hispanic/Latino families and less-educated families have lower levels of wealth than their peers. Fewer resources, labor market challenges and greater sensitivity to macroeconomic conditions make it more difficult for these groups to be economically resilient and upwardly mobile.
Back to Top