WOMEN IN ECONOMICS

A Podcast Series from the St. Louis Fed's
Timely Topics audio channel

Less than a third of the students who graduate with bachelor’s degrees in economics are women. That percentage of women further dwindles as education levels rise and as careers in economics advance.

In “Women in Economics,” we highlight the careers of women on the narrow end of those statistics: those who have become prominent economists in this global profession.

Episode 6: Loretta Mester

Loretta Mester headshot“We are identified as women in the field, and yet, we really want to be known as good in the field regardless of whether we’re a woman or a man,” says Loretta Mester, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. She talks about being a leader in the male-dominated field of economics, her love of math and how she “lucked into economics.” More about this episode »

Episode 5: Paulina Restrepo-Echavarria

“We need to fix the issue of girls thinking that they cannot study something with math,” says Paulina Restrepo-Echavarria, a research economist at the St. Louis Fed. She talks about the economic theory of matching and how it applies to finding a spouse or partner, why we need more women in macroeconomics and how we should encourage girls to pursue economics and other fields involving math. More about this episode »

Episode 4: Susan Feigenbaum

“I firmly believe that there is more ‘we’ and less ‘me’ among women, which leads to productive teamsmanship and the nurturing of each other and the next generation of economists, whether male or female,” says Susan Feigenbaum. Feigenbaum is a curators’ distinguished teaching professor in the department of economics at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. More about this episode »

Episode 3: Claudia Sahm

“Maybe we can do better than we have,” on diversity in economics, says Claudia Sahm, the section chief for consumer and community development at the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. Despite groups and newsletters dedicated to women, minorities and the LGBT community, Sahm said there is room for improvement in the field. More about this episode »

Episode 2: Ellen Zentner

“I realized that keeping your head down and working hard was not going to get you that far, because you need to get recognized for that,” says Ellen Zentner, chief economist at Morgan Stanley. This “aha” moment led Zentner to actively manage her career, and the result was advancement and success. Zentner went from the University of Colorado to the state of Texas and finally to Wall Street.
More about this episode »

Episode 1: Mary Daly

“There’s no way that I would have been able to find my way without some help,” says Mary Daly. She shares her story of how she went from high school dropout to research director at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Daly credits a counselor, a professor, and even former Fed chair Janet Yellen for aiding in her success. More about this episode »

About Women in Economics

Women in Economics is a podcast series in our Timely Topics audio channel. Subscribe to Timely Topics on iTunes and Stitcher or listen on our website.

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