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Bryan J. Noeth

Despite Aggressive Deleveraging, Generation X Remains "Generation Debt"

By William R. Emmons and Bryan J. Noeth

 

Hispanic Population's Share of Wealth Likely to Increase by 2025

By William R. Emmons and Bryan J. Noeth

 

Housing Crash Continues to Overshadow Young Families' Balance Sheets

By William R. Emmons and Bryan J. Noeth

 

Five Simple Questions That Reveal Your Financial Health and Wealth

By William R. Emmons and Bryan J. Noeth

 

Enrollment, Student Debt and LMI Communities

By Bryan J. Noeth

Bryan Noeth, a policy analyst for the St. Louis Fed’s Center for Household Financial Stability, lays out the case for focusing attention on student loan borrowers with seemingly manageable levels of debt who still have problems making payments.

 

Wealth Recovery Still Not Complete, Remains Uneven Across Families and Locations

By William R. Emmons and Bryan J. Noeth

 

Housing Rebound Broadens the Wealth Recovery But Much More is Needed

By William R. Emmons and Bryan J. Noeth

 

Still Digging Out: Real Net Worth per Household Has Rebounded 63 Percent Since Hitting Bottom in Early 2009

By William R. Emmons and Bryan J. Noeth

 

District Overview: Student-Loan Debt in the District—Reasons behind the Recent Increase

By Charles S. Gascon and Bryan J. Noeth

 

The Nation's Wealth Recovery Since 2009 Conceals Vastly Different Balance-Sheet Realities among America's Families

By William R. Emmons and Bryan J. Noeth

 

Online Extra: Mortgage Borrowing: The Boom and Bust

By William R. Emmons and Bryan J. Noeth

The buildup of mortgage debt before the crisis and the subsequent deleveraging have had profoundly different effects on different age groups. Younger families generally experienced the most volatility, while older families emerged with the largest net increase in mortgage debt.

 

Household Financial Stability: Who Suffered the Most from the Crisis?

By William R. Emmons and Bryan J. Noeth

The financial crisis and ensuing recession took a toll on just about everybody’s household wealth. Not surprisingly, the pain wasn’t evenly distributed. Those groups that are usually the most vulnerable in our society—young and middle-aged minority households—suffered the most, percentage-wise.

 

Why Did Young Households Lose so Much Wealth During the Crash?
The Role of Homeownership

By William R. Emmons and Bryan J. Noeth

 

A Look at Credit Default Swaps and Their Impact on the European Debt Crisis

By Bryan J. Noeth and Rajdeep Sengupta

Did you know that buying a credit default swap can be like buying insurance on your neighbor’s car—and then getting paid when that neighbor has an accident? Learn the ABCs of CDS, and find out why they are so important to any discussion of the European debt crisis.

 

Unsteady Progress: Income Trends in the Federal Reserve's Survey of Consumer Finances

By William R. Emmons and Bryan J. Noeth

 

Emerging Markets: A Source of and Destination for Capital

By Bryan J. Noeth and Rajdeep Sengupta

Increasingly, emerging markets are becoming a source of growth in the global economy. For example, foreign direct investment both into and out of these countries has shown a phenomenal increase since 2000.

 

Shifting Fortunes: Wealth Trends in the Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finances

By William R. Emmons and Bryan J. Noeth

 

Is Shadow Banking Really Banking?

By Bryan J. Noeth and Rajdeep Sengupta

To those who don't know, the term "shadow banking" probably has a negative connotation. This primer draws parallels between what has been termed the shadow banking sector and the traditional banking sector—showing that they are similar in many ways.

 

A Closer Look at House Price Indexes

By Bryan J. Noeth and Rajdeep Sengupta

 

Have the Trends in Housing Bottomed Out?

By Bryan J. Noeth and Rajdeep Sengupta

On a national level, the number of vacant homes is declining, as is the percentage of mortgages in serious delinquency. However, the demand for housing hasn't picked up, nor have prices.

 

Economic Focus: Underwriting on Subprime Mortgages: What Really Happened?

By Rajdeep Sengupta and Bryan J. Noeth

How did poor underwriting bring about the collapse of the subprime mortgage market?  More importantly, how would subprime mortgages perform if underwriting standards did not deteriorate?

 

Flight to Safety and U.S. Treasury Securities

By Bryan J. Noeth and Rajdeep Sengupta

As in most crises, investors turned to Treasuries in droves over the past couple of years, even as yields declined.