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Howard J. Wall

The "Man-Cession" of 2008-2009: It's Big, but It's Not Great

By Howard J. Wall

That men are losing jobs at a much faster rate than women during this recession shouldn't be a surprise.  The pattern is typical.  And it's not just the men in the hard hats who are out of a job—men in almost all categories of work are being affected disproportionately.

 

This Recession’s Effect on Employment: How It Stacks Up for Blacks, Whites, Men and Women

By Howard J. Wall

 

Need and the Need for Favors Motivate Foreign Aid Decisions

By Howard J. Wall

Bermuda gets $46,000 a year, while Iraq receives $2.3 billion. What motivates donors to give aid to other countries? Need—and the need for favors.

 

District Overview: Revisions in Jobs Data: A New Picture of Metro-Area Employment in the Eighth District

By Michael R. Pakko and Howard J. Wall

 

National Overview: Walking a Tightrope into 2008

By Joshua A. Byrge and Howard J. Wall

 

District Overview: Population, Sprawl and Immigration Trends in Eighth District Metro Areas Vary Widely

By Michael R. Pakko and Howard J. Wall

 

District Overview: Revised Data Show Larger Job Gains for Eighth District Metro Area

By Michael R. Pakko and Howard J. Wall

 

District Overview: Louisville's Job Growth Lags on Many Fronts

By Kristie M. Engemann and Howard J. Wall

 

District Overview: Slow and Steady in St. Louis

By Kristie M. Engemann and Howard J. Wall

 

National Overview: Official Dates for Business Cycles Don’t Capture All the Ups and Downs

By Howard J. Wall

 

Entrepreneurs in the U.S. Face Less Red Tape

By William Poole and Howard J. Wall

Government red tape is minimal for those starting a business in this country compared with many other places around the globe.  It is this relatively unfettered policy environment that allows our strong entrepreneurial spirit to flourish.

 

National and District Overview: Focusing on St. Louis Employment

By Howard J. Wall

 

A Jobless Recovery with More People Working?

By Kevin L. Kliesen and Howard J. Wall

One employment survey said 800,000 jobs were lost in the two years after the recession ended in November 2001. Another survey said 2 million more people were working. Can anyone account for this huge gap?

 

National and District Overview: Recessions, Expansions and Black Employment

By Howard J. Wall

 

Anecdotes Help Fed to Steer the Economy

By William Poole and Howard J. Wall

Formal data don’t tell policy-makers everything they need to know about the economy. The Federal Open Market Committee also pays attention to anecdotes gathered from the front lines of business.

 

To Bear or Not to Bear

By Paige M. Skiba and Howard J. Wall

Weighing the costs vs. the benefits of having children may seem like a cold-blooded exercise. Yet such an analysis can help us understand not only such private decisions but public policies, too.

 

How Much of the Gender Wage Gap Is Due to Discrimination?

By Howard J. Wall and Alyson Reed

Not much, says economist Howard Wall. Plenty, says Alyson Reed of the National Committee On Pay Equity.

 

National and District Overview: 281 Million and Counting

By Howard J. Wall

 

The Gender Wage Gap And Wage Discrimination: Illusion or Reality?

By Howard J. Wall

The wage gap between men and women is not as large as you think, nor is it entirely due to discrimination.

 

Now And Forever NAFTA

By Howard J. Wall

U.S. exports have been booming since the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement. But is the story the same for every state?

 

Price Stability And The Rising Tide: How Low Inflation Lifts All Ships

By William Poole and Howard J. Wall

The low and stable inflation that the Fed has relentlessly pursued over the past decade or so has buoyed virtually all demographic groups, enabling most Americans to do a lot more than just keep their heads above water.

 

'Voting with Your Feet' and Metro-Area Livability

By Howard J. Wall

Lists of the best places to live in the United States are as controversial and subjective as lists of Oscar nominees. A simple economic principle, though, can make the rankings much more objective and reflective of the average person’s views.