Looking for online courses for your students? Our award-winning collection of resources will help bring economics and personal finance lessons to life for your students with interactive activities, online courses, podcasts and more.

Learn more about the Online Courses.

To register your students for these courses, visit the Instructor Management Panel.

If you have an account, you can login now!





Forgot Login/Password?

First time user

Create Custom Flash Card Decks

Create custom flash card decks by adding glossary terms to the cart. Just click the add icon next to a term.

To remove terms, click the remove icon next to the term or click the edit cart icon and check the terms you wish to remove.

When finished, click the print icon to generate a PDF for single- or double-sided flash card printing.

EDIT FLASH CARD CART

PLEASE CHOOSE FLASH CARD PRINTING MODE

Create Custom Flash Card Decks

Create custom flash card decks by adding glossary terms to the cart. Just click the add icon next to a term.

To remove terms, click the remove icon next to the term or click the edit cart icon and check the terms you wish to remove.

When finished, click the print icon to generate a PDF for single- or double-sided flash card printing.


To print flash card decks using the double-sided printing mode, we recommend the following settings. Please note that your printer options may vary.

We cannot guarantee printer functionality and suggest that you first test double-sided printing using this file, trying other settings if the above recommendations do not print your flash card decks correctly.

Home > Education Resources > exploring-economics-video-series > the-economics-of-infrastructure

Economic Education

The Economics of Infrastructure

The Economics of Infrastructure logo“The Economics of Infrastructure” is the first video in the Exploring Economics animated series. It shows how infrastructure such as roads, bridges, railroad lines, water mains, sewer pipes, and power lines support the operation of an economy.

To provide students with online questions following each video, register your class through the Instructor Management Panel.

 

Transcript

Narrator: Let’s explore a little economics.

Person 1: Hey, that looks like a good place for a new department store.

Person 2: How do we get there?

Person 1: Hey, look. The new department store is finished.

Person 2: Yes. Let’s take a look inside.

Person 1: Hey, it’s dark in here.

Person 2: Someone should turn on the lights.

Person 3: I hit the switch, but nothing happened. I think something was forgotten.

All three voices: That’s better.

Person 1: Hey, it’s cold in here.

Person 2: Yes, there doesn’t seem to be any heat.

All three voices: That’s better.

Person 1: Hey, something else is missing.

Person 2: There doesn’t seem to be any water.

All three voices: Ahh, that’s much better.

Narrator: Roads, bridges, railroads, electrical power, water pipes, and the pipes that carry natural gas, are examples of infrastructure required for the economy to work. And, what’s an economy? An economy is the way people use resources to produce goods and services and get those goods and services to other people.

Narrator: Resources are transported to businesses and used to produce goods and services. Goods are produced and transported to the store on roads, railroad tracks, and by airplanes. People drive along roads and bridges to get to stores and offices. Stores and offices are lighted, heated, cooled, and have running water. People work at stores and in offices, and consumers buy goods and services in stores.

Narrator: There’s infrastructure that supports the economy all over the country. Some of the infrastructure is underground. Let’s take a look at some of the infrastructure underground in St. Louis. The utility wires, water mains, sewer lines—all part of the infrastructure of St. Louis. So are the roads and bridges. Infrastructure supports a working economy.

Tags: , , , , ,