Federal Reserve System and the Conference of State Bank Supervisors

Community Banking in the 21st Century

October 2-3, 2013, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Presenters, Speakers, Authors and Moderators

Dean F. Amel is a senior economist in the Division of Research and Statistics of the Federal Reserve Board, where he has worked for 29 years. Among his regulatory responsibilities, Amel coordinates the competitive review of bank holding company and bank applications and helps to enforce the deposit and liability caps on financial institutions. In addition, Amel has numerous publications in academic journals and books covering many aspects of the banking industry. He has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin and a doctorate from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

William F. Bassett is a deputy associate director in the Division of Monetary Affairs with oversight responsibilities for the Banking Analysis section at the Federal Reserve Board. The section is responsible for producing high-quality economic research and analysis of bank profitability and balance sheet developments as they relate to the formulation of monetary policy and macroeconomic performance. He has been at the Board since 1999 serving in both the Division of Monetary Affairs and the Division of Banking Supervision and Regulation. He has a master’s degree and a doctorate in economics from Brown University, and received a bachelor’s degree in economics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Ben S. Bernanke began a second term as Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board on Feb. 1, 2010. Bernanke also serves as Chairman of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC), the System’s principal monetary policymaking body. He originally took office as Chairman on Feb. 1, 2006, when he also began a 14-year term as a member of the Board. His second term as Chairman ends Jan. 31, 2014, and his term as a Board member ends Jan. 31, 2020. Before his appointment as Board Chairman, Bernanke was chairman of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers from June 2005 to January 2006. Bernanke has already served the Federal Reserve System in several roles. He was a member of the Federal Reserve Board from 2002 to 2005; a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve banks of Philadelphia (1987-89), Boston (1989-90) and New York (1990-91, 1994-96); and a member of the Academic Advisory Panel at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York (1990-2002). From 1994 to 1996, Bernanke was the Class of 1926 professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton University. He was the Howard Harrison and Gabrielle Snyder Beck professor of economics and public affairs and chair of the Economics Department at the university from 1996 to 2002. He had been a professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton since 1985. He received a bachelor’s degree in economics from Harvard University (summa cum laude) and a doctorate in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Lamont Black is an assistant professor of finance at DePaul University in Chicago. Prior to joining DePaul, Black was an economist at the Federal Reserve Board for eight years, where he worked in the Division of Research and Statistics and the Division of International Finance. His responsibilities at the Board included the evaluation of bank regulatory policies during the financial crisis and the monitoring of developments in the European banking sector during the sovereign-debt crisis. His current research includes topics such as contagion in the banking system, the role of the lender-of-last-resort in liquidity provision and systemic risk. His previous research has appeared or is forthcoming in the Journal of Banking and Finance, the Journal of Financial Services Research, Finance Research Letters and the Journal of Financial Stability. His teaching is in the areas of commercial banking and money markets. He received a bachelor’s degree from Stanford University, a master’s degree in economics from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and a doctorate in economics and finance from the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University.

Richard A. Brown concurrently serves as the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.’s (FDIC) chief economist and as associate director in the FDIC’s Division of Insurance and Research. As chief economist, he is responsible for developing and communicating the FDIC’s perspective on a wide range of economic and risk-management issues. Brown speaks often on the economy to bankers and trade groups and has been interviewed by the Wall Street Journal, Fortune, Business Week, CNBC and other media outlets. Prior to coming to the FDIC in 1990, Brown held research positions at the Resolution Trust Corporation, the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation and the Federal Home Loan Bank Board. Brown completed a doctorate in economics at The George Washington University in 1994 and received a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Cincinnati in 1984.

James Bullard is president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, positions he has held since 2008. In these roles, he participates in the Federal Open Market Committee and directs the activities of the Federal Reserve’s Eighth District head office in St. Louis and branches in Little Rock, Louisville and Memphis. An economist and monetary policy scholar, Bullard has been with the Bank since 1990. His research has appeared in numerous professional journals, including the American Economic Review, the Journal of Monetary Economics, Macroeconomic Dynamics and the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking. He has been a peer reviewer for more than two dozen periodicals and institutions, and currently is co-editor of the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control. Beyond the Fed, Bullard is an honorary professor of economics at Washington University in St. Louis, where he also sits on the advisory council of the economics department and the advisory boards of the Center for Dynamic Economics and the Wells Fargo Advisors Center for Finance and Accounting Research. He is a member of the University of Missouri-St. Louis Chancellor’s Council, the United Way U.S.A. Board of Trustees and the Greater St. Louis Financial Forum. Bullard also serves on the board of the St. Louis Regional Chamber. Bullard received his doctorate in economics from Indiana University in Bloomington. He holds bachelor’s degrees in economics and in quantitative methods and information systems from St. Cloud State University in St. Cloud, Minn.

Robert (Bob) DeYoung is the Capitol Federal Distinguished Professor in Financial Markets and Institutions at the University of Kansas (KU) School of Business. He is also co-editor of the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, director of the Center for Excellence in Banking at KU, a senior fellow at the FDIC’s Center for Financial Research and an ongoing lecturer at the Barcelona Graduate School of Economics and at the University of Limoges graduate economics program. DeYoung has written extensively on the performance and regulation of financial institutions in leading academic journals, regulatory publications and the financial press. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University-Camden in 1983 and a doctorate in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1989.

Gary D. Ferrier is the holder of the Lewis E. Epley Jr. professorship in economics at the Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas. He currently serves as the associate dean for undergraduate programs. Ferrier earned his bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Wisconsin and his doctorate in economics from the University of North Carolina. In addition to his faculty role at the University of Arkansas, Ferrier has been affiliated with institutions in Dallas, Kuala Lumpur, Rome, Aarhus and Washington, D.C. He has served as an adviser to the Federal Reserve and the World Bank. Ferrier’s research focuses on measuring the levels and determinants of efficiency and productivity. He has published in the Journal of Econometric; the Journal of Monetary Economic; the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking; the European Journal of Operational Research; the Journal of Productivity Analysis; and the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization.

Jim Fuchs is an assistant vice president at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, overseeing the operations of the Bank’s Supervisory Policy and Risk Analysis Unit, Community Development and the St. Louis Fed’s Center for Household Financial Stability. Before joining the St. Louis Fed, Fuchs directed financial communications and served as a banking policy adviser to New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli. Earlier, Fuchs was chief of staff to former New York State Banking Superintendent Diana L. Taylor and served as an adviser to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. He received his MBA from the University of Missouri-St. Louis and his bachelor’s degree from the U.S. Air Force Academy. He also earned a graduate certificate in communications from the University of Oklahoma and a teaching certificate in secondary mathematics from City College in New York. Fuchs is a graduate of the Department of Defense Information School.

R. Alton Gilbert is a visiting scholar in the Supervisory Policy and Risk Analysis unit of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. He retired from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in 2004. He received his doctorate in economics from Texas A&M University in 1971. His current research agenda focuses on community banks.

Dennis Glennon is director of the Credit Risk Analysis Division at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. His research interests are in the areas of credit scoring, credit-risk modeling and bank failure analysis. His current research projects include the application of maximum entropy econometric techniques to bank-failure and loan-default modeling, the development of competing-risk models of Small Business Administration loan default and prepayment behavior, and the development of alternative methods of assessing model risk. He actively participates in the supervision of retail-lending decision and regulatory capital models. Glennon received his doctorate in economics from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Valentina Hartarska is a professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology and in the Department of Finance at Auburn University. She studies efficiency, governance and performance in banks and microfinance institutions and is responsible for graduate classes in finance, economic development and econometrics. Hartarska has published in more than 30 journals including the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, the Journal of Banking and Finance, the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, and World Development; she has also published several book chapters on banking and microfinance. Hartarska has received various competitive scholarships including one from the Center for Financial Research at the FDIC. She has also consulted for the World Bank and the Farm Credit System and has been a speaker at the Federal Reserve System Conference. Hartarska received her doctorate from Ohio State University in 2002.

Curt Hecker is CEO and president of Intermountain Community Bancorp and Panhandle State Bank, which operate 21 branches in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. A native of Boise, Idaho, Hecker joined Panhandle State Bank in 1995 following 11 years of experience as vice president and manager at West One Bank (formerly Idaho First National Bank). Hecker received his business administration degree from Boise State University in 1983 and graduated from Pacific Coast Banking School in 1994. During his tenure at the company, Hecker has demonstrated his leadership and expertise in economic planning and community action with numerous programs designed to support businesses and promote the work of local nonprofits. Active in community affairs, Hecker serves on a number of business and nonprofit boards. He joined the Directors of Coldwater Creek Inc., a publicly traded retail company, in 1996, and accepted a seat on the board of Pacific Coast Bankers’ Bank in 2009.

Scott E. Hein holds the Robert C. Brown Chair of Finance at Texas Tech University, where he has been on the faculty since 1983. He also serves as the faculty director of the Texas Tech School of Banking and serves on the faculty at the Graduate School of Banking at Colorado, as well as the Southwestern Graduate School of Banking at Southern Methodist University, where he teaches monetary and financial economics to community bankers. Hein is also a member of the Teaching Academy at Texas Tech University, which promotes teaching excellence at Texas Tech University. In 2012, Hein, along with two Texas Tech University colleagues, became co-editors of the academic journal, The Journal of Financial Research. He is a former senior economist of the Federal Reserve Bank of St Louis and has served as a visiting scholar in the research departments of the Federal Reserve banks of Atlanta and Dallas. He has a bachelor’s and master’s degree in economics from the University of New Mexico and a doctorate from the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University.

John Kandrac is an economist at the Federal Reserve Board. Previously, he worked for J.P. Morgan Private Bank and served as an instructor at the University of Oregon. His research interests include topics in banking and finance, the role of banks in monetary transmission, and assessing the effects of large-scale asset purchases. He received his doctorate in economics in 2011 from the University of Oregon.

Charles Kelly is an instructor in management and finance at the Romain College of Business at the University of Southern Indiana-Evansville. He has more than 30 years of experience in banking and finance. At Citicorp Industrial Credit, he was a member of the large ticket equipment financing group. As part of PNC Financial Corporation, he introduced the leveraged leasing, facility leasing and lease advisory products. Kelly introduced and developed leasing products at National City Bank of Evansville, Ind., and at German American Bancorp, Jasper, Ind. At the University of Southern Indiana, he teaches strategic planning, real-estate finance, personal financial planning and entrepreneurial finance. He also provides consulting services to community banks focusing on new product development and, most recently, organized a regional town hall meeting as a part of the Federal Reserve/ CSBS Community Banking Research Conference. Kelly received his master’s from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Mohammed Khayum is a professor of economics and dean of the Romain College of Business at the University of Southern Indiana. He received his doctorate in 1990 from Temple University. His research interests include innovative approaches to strategic planning and the impact of communication and information technologies on entrepreneurship in the 21st century. He is currently working on a project that analyzes innovation and entrepreneurship ecosystems and regularly shares his perspectives about the economic development prospects for the Evansville, Ind., region.

Seung Jung Lee is an economist in the Banking Analysis Section in the Division of Monetary Affairs at the Federal Reserve Board. Before joining the Banking Analysis Section in 2009, he worked in the Quantitative Risk Management Section in the Division of Banking Supervision and Regulation for more than two years. Lee holds a doctorate in economics from the University of Chicago and a bachelor’s degree in economics from Yale University.

Yan Lee is a senior financial economist in the Center for Financial Research at the FDIC. She received her doctorate in economics in 2005 from the University of California-Los Angeles, with a specialization in labor and applied micro. Prior to graduate studies, she attended Barnard College at Columbia University, and was employed at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Lee’s research interests include crime, homeownership and entrepreneurship.

Tanya Marsh is an associate professor of law at Wake Forest University School of Law in Winston-Salem, N.C., where she teaches property; real estate transactions; a seminar on law, business, and the economy; funeral and cemetery law; and professional development. Her scholarship addresses commercial real estate, the regulation of community banks and the laws regarding the status, treatment and disposition of human remains. A graduate of Indiana University and Harvard Law School, before joining the Wake Forest faculty in 2010, Marsh clerked for the Indiana Supreme Court, practiced commercial real estate and corporate law with two large Indianapolis law firms, and spent five years as in-house counsel with a public shopping center REIT. Marsh is involved in the leadership of the American Bar Association’s Real Property Trust & Estate Law Section and is a frequent contributor to that section’s CLE offerings.

Bobby Martin is chairman of the board of The Peoples Bank, Ripley, Miss. He has actively served as an officer and employee of The Peoples Bank for the past 52 years. He is a past chairman of Mississippi State Board of Banking Review and has served as president of the Mississippi Banker Association. Martin received his bachelor’s degree from Mississippi State University and is a graduate of the Louisiana State University School of Banking of the South. He holds an honorary doctor of business degree from Mississippi State University.

Andrew P. Meyer is a senior economist in the Supervisory Policy and Risk Analysis unit of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. He received a doctorate in economics from Washington University in St. Louis and has worked at the Federal Reserve since 1994. In addition to his research on community banking issues, he conducts statistical analysis of the downgrade and failure risk of commercial banks. He also serves on a system committee to improve the Federal Reserve’s off-site bank surveillance program and has taught regularly in examiner training schools.

Joseph Norman is a corporate attorney in the Charlotte, N.C., office of K&L Gates LLP. Prior to his career in law, he worked in equity research for Wells Fargo Wealth Management. He received his Juris Doctor from Wake Forest University School of Law in 2012 and his master’s degree in business administration from the McColl School of Business at Queens University of Charlotte in 2009.

Robert R. Moore is an assistant vice president in the Financial Industry Studies department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. Previously, he was an assistant professor of economics at Tulane University. His interests include financial markets and institutions in general and off-site surveillance models for financial institutions in particular. He received his doctorate in economics in 1987 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Peter J. Nigro is currently the Sarkisian Chair in Financial Services at Bryant University in Smithfield, R.I. Prior to joining Bryant, he served as a senior financial economist in the Policy Analysis Division at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency for more than a decade. His research interests include small business finance, credit risk modeling and bank compliance issues. Nigro received a bachelor’s degree from the College of the Holy Cross, a master’s in economics from the University of Southern California and a doctorate in economics from Boston College.

Elizabeth Organ is a research analyst with the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. She has a bachelor’s degree in economics (summa cum laude) from the University of Texas at Dallas, where she was a Eugene McDermott Scholar. While pursuing her degree, Organ was an Archer Fellow in Washington, D.C., where she worked in government affairs at the Financial Services Roundtable. She also served an internship with the Division of Insurance and Research at the Dallas Regional Office of the FDIC.

Robin A. Prager is a senior adviser in the Division of Research and Statistics at the Federal Reserve Board. She joined the Board staff in 1994 as an economist in the Financial Structure Section, and served as chief of the Financial Structure Section from 2000 to 2007. Throughout her tenure at the Board, Prager has been involved in conducting economic analysis of issues relating to the structure and performance of the financial services sector, with an emphasis on banking. Recently, much of her attention has been devoted to issues surrounding the availability of credit to small businesses and the role of community banks in the U.S. financial system. Prager received a bachelor’s degree in economics from Harvard University and a doctorate in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Prior to joining the staff of the Federal Reserve Board, Prager served on the faculty of the Owen Graduate School of Management at Vanderbilt University for several years. She has also been a visiting faculty member at Boston University’s School of Management and MIT’s Sloan School of Management, as well as a visiting senior policy scholar at Georgetown University’s Center for Business and Public Policy. She currently serves on the editorial boards of the Review of Industrial Organization and the Journal of Regulatory Economics.

Curtis R. Price is an assistant professor of economics in the Romain College of Business at the University of Southern Indiana. His main research interests are in managerial economics, experimental methodology and the intersection of gender and competition. He earned his doctorate in economics from Purdue University in 2008.

Jerome H. Powell was appointed to the Federal Reserve Board on May 25, 2012, to fill an unexpired term ending Jan. 31, 2014. Prior to his appointment, Powell was a visiting scholar at the Bipartisan Policy Center in Washington, D.C., where he focused on federal and state fiscal issues. From 1997 through 2005, Powell was a partner at The Carlyle Group. Powell served as an assistant secretary and as undersecretary of the Treasury under President George H.W. Bush, with responsibility for policy on financial institutions, the Treasury debt market and related areas. Prior to joining the Administration, he worked as a lawyer and investment banker in New York City. He received an A.B. in politics from Princeton University in 1975 and earned a law degree from Georgetown University in 1979. While at Georgetown, he was editor-in-chief of the Georgetown Law Journal.

Harvey Rosenblum is executive vice president and senior economic advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, serving as economic policy adviser to the Bank’s president. Until Sept. 1, 2013, he was the Dallas Fed’s executive vice president and director of research, and an associate economist for the FOMC. He is a past president of the National Association for Business Economics. Until recently, he was executive director of the International Banking, Economics and Finance Association; and a board member and secretary/treasurer for Western Economic Association International. A widely recognized expert on both the national and Texas economies, he has published articles in the Journal of Finance, Wall Street Journal, New York Times and the Handbook of Banking Strategy. His current research interests focus on monetary policy and financial regulation. Rosenblum began his career in 1970 as an economist with the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. He joined the Dallas Fed as senior vice president and director of research in 1985 and was promoted to executive vice president in 2005. He is currently an adjunct professor of finance at Southern Methodist University. Rosenblum received a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Connecticut in 1965 and a doctorate in economics from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1972.

John W. Ryan is the president and CEO of the CSBS, the national association representing state banking supervisors and the leading advocate for advancing the state banking system. Before being named CSBS president and CEO in August 2011, Ryan was CSBS’s executive vice president, a position he held since October 2003. He first joined CSBS in 1997 as an assistant vice president for legislative affairs. Prior to joining CSBS, Ryan worked at Newmyer Associates, a public affairs consulting firm, where he led the company’s financial services consulting practice. Previous to his work at Newmyer Associates, Ryan spent four years as a professional staff member to the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs. Ryan received a bachelor’s degree in political science and economics from the University of California-Berkeley.

Dorothy A. Savarese is the chairman, president and CEO of The Cape Cod Five Cents Savings Bank, an independent Massachusetts state-chartered savings bank founded in 1855. Savarese joined Cape Cod Five in 1993 as a commercial lending officer. She then became senior vice president, director of product planning before she was named chief operating officer in 2004 and served in that capacity until becoming president and CEO in 2005. She is chairman of the board of trustees of the Cape Cod Five and chairman of The Cape Cod Five Cents Savings Bank Charitable Foundation Trust. She is past chairman and a member of the board of the Massachusetts Bankers Association, as well as a member of the board of directors of the American Bankers Association and the American Bankers Mutual Insurance Ltd. She also serves on the FDIC Advisory Committee on Community Banking. Savarese received an MBA from Suffolk University’s Sawyer Business School. In 2012, Savarese was named one of the 25 Most Powerful Women in Banking by American Banker magazine.

Michael A. Seamans is a financial industry analyst in the Financial Industry Studies department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas and teaches finance for the University of Phoenix. His research interests include bank performance analysis, financial institution regulation and off-site surveillance modeling. Seamans received a master’s degree from Southern Methodist University and a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University.

Xuan (Shelly) Shen recently received her doctorate in applied economics from Auburn University. Her dissertation empirically examined a variety of factors affecting U.S. bank performance. Shen has also published several articles in professional journals on various topics related to banking. She is currently employed as a quantitative analyst at Regions Bank in Birmingham, Ala.

Thomas W. Spiller is a computer applications analyst in the Surveillance section of the Division of Banking Supervision and Regulation at the Federal Reserve Board. The section is responsible for directing and coordinating the Federal Reserve System’s identification and monitoring of banking organizations, in addition to providing tools and databases to facilitate data driven analysis within the System. He has been at the Board since 2009 serving in the Division of Monetary Affairs before moving to the Division of Banking Supervision and Regulation. He has a bachelor’s degree in economics and computer science from Claremont McKenna College.

Thomas Spitz is the founder and CEO of Settlers Bank, Windsor, Wis. With more than 30 years in the industry, Spitz has an extensive range of experience that spans from community banking to corporate commercial lending. He has worked for some of the nation’s largest commercial banks, including what are now U.S. Bank and Chase Bank. He was also the president of a de novo effort aimed at the delivery of banking services to low-income consumers nationwide. Within the banking industry, Spitz is a past director of the Community Bankers of Wisconsin and served on its executive committee. He also serves on the Department of Financial Institution’s Banking Review Board as a gubernatorial appointee. Spitz graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee with a bachelor’s degree in business administration and an MBA from Marquette University.

Kenneth Spong is an assistant vice president and economist in the Banking Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. His research work has included corporate governance and the ownership and management structure of banks, public policy issues raised by deposit insurance, macroprudential supervision, large banks and too-big-to-fail concerns, community banks and small business lending, interstate banking, and home financing and homeownership issues among low-income households. He has also written a book on bank regulation–Banking Regulation: Its Purposes, Implementation, and Effects–which is now in its fifth edition. Spong has a master’s degree in economics from the University of Chicago and a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and economics from the University of Kansas.

Julie Stackhouse is senior vice president and managing officer of Banking Supervision, Credit, Community Development and Learning Innovation for the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. Prior to joining the St. Louis Fed in September 2002, Stackhouse was vice president and managing officer of the Risk Management Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. In addition, she was formerly an officer with the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City prior to relocating to Minnesota in 1995. She served in many capacities in the Kansas City Banking Supervision and Risk Management areas, starting as an examiner in 1980. Stackhouse has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Drake University and is a graduate of the Wisconsin Graduate School of Banking. In 2010, Stackhouse was named a St. Louis Business Journal “Most Influential Business Women” recipient.

Michael L. Stevens serves as the senior executive vice president at the CSBS. In this capacity, Stevens is responsible for public policy, financial supervision and federal coordination. Current responsibilities are focused on the future of community banking, implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act and the establishment of the Financial Stability Oversight Council and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Prior to his appointment in September 2011, he served as the senior vice president for Regulatory Policy, representing the state banking system in the development of policy in the areas of financial stability, prudential supervision and consumer protection. He joined CSBS in 1999 to work in all facets of CSBS’s Professional Development Division. He is a frequent instructor and speaker on bank examination, bank financial analysis and regulatory issues. Stevens serves on the faculty of the Graduate School of Banking at Colorado and the Texas Tech Bank School. He began his regulatory career at the Iowa Division of Banking, where he served as a bank examiner for 11 years. He is a graduate of the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Claire W. Tucker is president and CEO of CapStar Bank, where she also serves as a director and as a member of the Asset/Liability Policy and Loan Committee. CapStar opened on July 14, 2008, with $88 million in capital, the highest level of start-up capital for a financial institution in Tennessee history. In 2011, the Federal Reserve Board of Atlanta appointed Tucker chairman of the Sixth Federal Reserve District Community Depository Institutions Advisory Council (CDIAC); she is also the Sixth District’s representative to the national CDIAC, which meets twice yearly with the Federal Reserve Board. The Nashville Post selected Tucker as a Power Banker in both 2011 and 2012, and she was chosen as a Woman to Watch for 2013 by American Banker. Tucker earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Tennessee Wesleyan College in 1975 and certification in 1982 as a certified management accountant. She is a graduate of Stonier Graduate School of Banking at Rutgers University and also holds an MBA from the University of Tennessee/Tennessee State University.

Charles A. Vice was appointed commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Financial Institutions (DFI) in August 2008. As the commissioner of DFI, Vice has responsibility for the regulatory oversight of all state-chartered financial institutions, which includes examinations, licensing of financial professionals, registration of securities and enforcement. Vice currently serves in a national leadership role through the CSBS. In May 2013, Vice was named chairman of the CSBS governing board. Vice also currently serves on the Federal Financial Institution Examination Council Taskforce on Supervision, which oversees guidance regarding safety and soundness issues relating to bank examinations. Previously, Vice was an employee of the FDIC for 18 years, serving in the Lexington, Ky., field office. During his tenure with the FDIC, Vice served as the office’s expert on subprime lending and capital markets. His awards have included the 2007 FDIC Chicago Region employee of the year. He earned a bachelor’s degree in finance from the University of Southern Mississippi in 1990.

Smith Williams is a senior financial economist for the Center for Financial Research at the FDIC. Her research interests include executive compensation and community banks. Prior to undertaking graduate studies, Williams worked in international policy. In 2010, she received her doctorate in economics from the University of California-Irvine.

Timothy J. Yeager is an associate professor of finance and holds the Arkansas Bankers Association Chair in Banking at the University of Arkansas. His responsibilities include teaching, research and outreach to Arkansas community bankers. Prior to joining the university in January 2006, Yaeger was an assistant vice president over the Supervisory Policy Analysis unit of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. Recently, his articles have been published in the Journal of Financial Intermediation, Journal of Money, Credit and Banking and the Journal of Banking and Finance. He has been quoted in numerous state and national news outlets, and his work has been featured in national newspapers and select trade publications. Yeager received a doctorate in economics in 1993 from Washington University.

Conference of State Bank Supervisor